Base Stabilization

LIQUIDOW™ calcium chloride provides distinct advantages.  The moisture absorption  properties of  LIQUIDOW™  calcium chloride helps retain water, coagulate fines, and decrease the size and number of voids

Full Depth Reclamation(FDR)
Full-depth reclamation (FDR) is a proven method for rebuilding deteriorated asphalt roads. It produces a strong road base, lowers material cost and eliminates the need for disposal of old pavement. The Asphalt Recycling & Reclaiming Association endorses FDR, stating, "The process has been proven on a wide range of flexible pavement structures to produce quality results at substantially lower costs and considerably shorter construction periods than conventional reconstruction practices."1

LIQUIDOW™  Calcium Chloride Benefits :

  • Rehabilitate asphalt and chip/seal roads at the job site. 
  • Eliminate the costs associated with removing, loading, hauling, and crushing.  Recycle the old pavement.
  • Fewer workers and less equipment results in lower costs and better traffic flow.
  • Conserve your natural resources. 
  • All existing material is reused. 
  • Base material costs are eliminated. 
  • The increase in density compaction adds years to the road life. 
  • Total pavement thickness can be reduced, resulting in lower overlay costs. 
  • With the addition of LIQUIDOW™  calcium chloride into your FDR project, savings as high as 50% over other methods are seen, while providing a better finished road quality.
 

 

Figure 1: Density comparison



21% Solution, 93% basis by weight







1Asphalt Recycling & Reclaiming Association. Full Depth Reclamation - A Century of Advancement for the New Millennium, Annapolis, Maryland: ARRA, January 2001
.

Figure 2-The modified reclaimer in action
Figure 3-Rolling and compaction
Figure 4-The reclaimed road after paving

For more information: www.liquidow.com

Adapted from an article in the December 2002 issue of Public Works.

1Asphalt Recycling & Reclaiming Association. Full Depth Reclamation - A Century of Advancement for the New Millennium, Annapolis, Maryland: ARRA, January 2001.